The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

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The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Brownie Zambian » 24th November 2012, 04:08

Dear Zambia,
Last month there was a complaint about busines people in Kamwala.
You see Sir,
- For 25 to 30 years now the Government has collected a very big amount of money from Kamwala but with no development.in the area.
-At this moment about K76 billion Kwacha is being collected every month from Kamwala only in Value Added Tax.
- About 43billion Kwacha is being generated from Kamwala every year in Licences and Levies
-about 113billion is being collected every year from property rates.
-K14billion Kwacha is income for the Council for Garbage collection every year.
If you add the above you will find a very big amount of money which the Government is collecting from Kamwala.
Now if you see that not even one road has been maintained in Kamwala for 25 years!!!
This is not fair and justice.
On top of that Sir, there are programs every day from Government to increase costs on the business- such as Salaries uniforms etc etc etc.
This is not fair and justice.
Some mistakes can be there for the Indian business people but surely for those who have employed so many local people for so many years including some social programs and even some partnerships why is the Government neglecting this very important area in Zambia.
Apart from the direct employment look at how many others benefit from the business in the area. Truck drivers, local wheelbarrow boys etc who would be lingering without employment.
This is not fair and justice, Sir.
Is it because the Indian people do not fight back?
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Brownie Zambian
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Mailoni » 24th November 2012, 07:01

Brownie Zambian i am shocked to hear that is how much money is coming from Kamwala.What i know is that the biggest tax evasion is done by Indians in Kamwala.In fact some ZRA employees call the area as a Bank.Am sure Kamwala can make even more than that and i encourage you to prevail over you Asian friends to be honest in their dealings so as to ensure that more money for tax is made.If not go back to India
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Mailoni
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Brownie Zambian » 24th November 2012, 10:11

Contradiction in your statement, boy!
Of course ZRA will call it a bank. They are collecting so much from here.
Either way if you know what I mean.
Dont evade the issue here.
We want development and I pay more tax than your sorry a**.
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Brownie Zambian
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Guest » 24th November 2012, 10:44

@mailoni listen here most of these tax evasions .less duties on cars illegal tenders going on and so many other vices are mostly done by black zambians .open your eyes and observe realities instead of doing the blame game . These indians have contributed and still doing alot of their fair share per zed. Wake up and smell the coffee.
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Guest
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Closed Minds » 24th November 2012, 13:11

Mailoni wrote :
What i know is that the biggest tax evasion is done by Indians in
> Kamwala.

Is that so? How do you know that Mailoni? Through age old prejudices? Flush them out your mind boy. The world is changing. You need to too.

The composition of shop owners in Kamwala and other trading areas like Freedom Way and Cha Cha Cha Road have changed over the years and is constantly morphing. Shops are now owned by not only Indians and other foreigners, but more and more Zambians also own these shops. The trading areas are ever expanding and most new tenants are Zambian. As an example, take a look at these sprouting 'malls' along Alick Nkhata Road in Kalingalinga. Who owns these places? Zambians! These Zambians are just as guilty of breaking any laws many of you accuse only Indians of breaking, i.e low wages and tax evasion. Are you telling me Indians are the people obliged to pay tax and pay minimum wage? Why? What about fellow Zambians? Are they exempt? If so, why? Is it because 'it's my country?'

Yes, Kamwala and other areas have the potential to contribute much more tax than they currently do, but the authorities should stop their selectively application of the laws and harass only Indians and other foreigners. If ZRA and the public want more tax, extend the so called tax net to include the thousands of Zambians who also own shops. Stop this nonsense of singling out only 'foreigners.' Also, to liken the example of NW Province, it generates the most amount of forex for the country, yet successive governments are neglecting its development and the people there feel neglected. Likewise, perhaps the govt and LCC should be seen to improve the infrastructure around these trading areas. Who know, when shop owners see the benefits of paying tax, ZRA may just double their collections next year...


Mailoni wrote :
>If not go back to India

When the authorities like ZRA, NAPSA, Ministry of Labour, and thick Ministers themselves conduct their 'random' spot checks, why do they pick out only Indians owned places? Is it an admission that Indians are an economically integral part of the country? If so, trust me, you might want to rethink your statement.
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Closed Minds
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Zambian Indian » 24th November 2012, 16:48

I was refused once, entry into India. They said you how come you and this man is having the same passport. You are looking different. I was with a local friend.
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Zambian Indian
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Brownie Zambian » 24th November 2012, 22:16

Dont change the subject guys.
Its just that you are a third class citizen in your own country, so live with it.
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Brownie Zambian
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Black » 25th November 2012, 01:35

The pattern of social classes in Hinduism is called the "caste system." The chart shows the major divisions and contents of the system. Basic caste is called varn.a, or "color." Subcaste, or jati, "birth, life, rank," is a traditional subdivision of varn.a.
The Bhagavad Gita says this about the varn.as:
The works of Brahmins, Ks.atriyas, Vaishyas, and Shudras are different, in harmony with the three powers of their born nature.
The works of a Brahmin are peace; self-harmony, austerity, and purity; loving-forgiveness and righteousness; vision and wisdom and faith.
These are the works of a Ks.atriya: a heroic mind, inner fire, constancy, resourcefulness, courage in battle, generosity and noble leadership.
Trade, agriculture and the rearing of cattle is the work of a Vaishya. And the work of the Shudra is service.
There are literally thousands of subcastes in India, often with particular geographical ranges and an administrative or corporate structure. When Mahatma Gandhi wanted to go to England to study law, he had to ask his subcaste for permission to leave India. ("Gandhi" means "greengrocer" -- from gandha, "smell, fragrance," in Sanskrit -- and that should be enough for a good guess that Gandhi was a Vaishya.) Sometimes it is denied that the varn.as are "castes" because, while "true" castes, the jatis, are based on birth, the varn.as are based on the theory of the gun.as (the "three powers" mentioned in the Gita). This is no more than a rationalization: the varn.as came first, and they are based on birth. The gun.as came later, and provide a poor explanation anyway, since the gun.a tamas is associated with both twice born and once born, caste and outcaste. Nevertheless, the varn.as are now divisions at a theoretical level, while the jatis are the way in which caste is embodied for most practical purposes. Jatis themselves can be ranked in relation to each other, and occasionally a question may even be raised about the proper varn.a to which a particular jati belongs.

Associated with each varn.a there is a traditional color. These sound suspiciously like skin colors; and, indeed, there is an expectation in India that higher caste people will have lighter skin -- although there are plenty of exceptions (especially in the South of India). This all probably goes back to the original invasion of the Arya, who came from Central Asia and so were undoubtedly light skinned. The people already in India were quite dark, even as today many people in India seem positively black. Apart from skin color, Indians otherwise have "Caucasian" features -- narrow noses, thin lips, etc. -- and recent genetic mapping studies seem to show that Indians are more closely related to the people of the Middle East and Europe than to anyone else. Because Untouchables are not a varn.a, they do not have a traditional color. I have supplied blue, since this is otherwise not found, and it is traditionally used for the skin color of Vis.n.u and his incarnations. Chief among those is Kr.s.n.a (Krishna), whose name actually means "black" or "dark," but he is always shown blue rather than with some natural skin color.

The first three varn.as are called the twice born. This has nothing to do with reincarnation. Being "twice born" means that you come of age religiously, making you a member of the Vedic religion, eligible to learn Sanskrit, study the Vedas, and perform Vedic rituals. The "second birth" is thus like Confirmation or a Bar Mitzvah. According to the Laws of Manu (whose requirements may not always be observed in modern life), boys are "born again" at specific ages: 8 for Brahmins; 11 for Ks.atriyas; and 12 for Vaishyas. A thread is bestowed at the coming of age to be worn around the waist as the symbol of being twice born. The equivalent of coming of age for girls is marriage. The bestowal of the thread is part of the wedding ceremony. That part of the wedding ritual is even preserved in Jainism. Ancient Iran also had a coming of age ceremony that involved a thread. That and other evidence leads to the speculation that the three classes of the twice born are from the original Indo-European social system -- the theory of George Dumazil. Even the distant Celts believed in three social classes. The three classes of Plato's Republic thus may not have been entirely his idea. Although there must have been a great deal of early intermarriage in India, nowhere did such an Indo-European social system become as rigid a system of birth as there. The rigidity may well be due to the influence of the idea of karma, that poor birth is morally deserved.

According to the Laws of Manu, when the twice born come of age, they enter into the four ashramas or "stages of life."

The first is the brahmacarya, or the stage of the student (brahmacarin). For boys, the student is supposed to go live with a teacher (guru), who is a Brahmin, to learn about Sanskrit, the Vedas, rituals, etc. The dharma of a student includes being obedient, respectful, celibate, and non-violent. "The teacher is God." For girls, the stage of studenthood coincides with that of the householder, and the husband stands in the place of the teacher. Since the boys are supposed to be celibate while students, Gandhi used the term brahmacari to mean the celibate practitioner that he thought made the best Satyagrahi, the best non-violent activist.

The second stage is the garhastya, or the stage of the householder, which is taken far more seriously in Hinduism than in Jainism or Buddhism and is usually regarded as mandatory, like studenthood, although debate continued over the centuries whether or not this stage could be skipped in favor of a later one. This is the stage where the principal dharma of the person is performed, whether as priest, warrior, etc., or for women mainly as wife and mother. Arjuna's duty to fight the battle in the Bhagavad Gita comes from his status as a householder. Besides specific duties, there are general duties that pay off the "three debts": a debt to the ancestors that is discharged by marrying and having children; a debt to the gods that is discharged by the household rituals and sacrifices; and a debt to the teacher that is discharged by appropriately teaching one's wife or children.
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Black
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Black » 25th November 2012, 01:36

The third stage is the vanaprastya, or the stage of the forest dweller. This may be entered into optionally if (ideally) one's hair has become gray, one's skin wrinkled, and grandchildren exist to carry on the family. Husbands and wives may leave their affairs and possessions with their children and retire together to the forest as hermits. This does not involve the complete renunciation of the world, for husbands and wives can still have sex (once a month), and a sacred fire still should be kept and minimal rituals performed. This stage is thus not entirely free of dharma. The Forest Treatises were supposed to have been written by or for forest dwellers, who have mostly renounced the world and have begun to consider liberation. I am not aware that forest dwelling is still practiced in the traditional way. The modern alternatives seem to consist of the more stark opposition between householding and becoming a wandering ascetic.

The fourth stage is the sannyasa, or the stage of the wandering ascetic, the sannyasin (or sadhu). If a man desires, he may continue on to this stage, but his wife will need to return home; traditionally she cannot stay alone as a forest dweller or wander the highways as an ascetic. The sannyasin has renounced the world completely, is regarded as dead by his family (the funeral is held), and is finally beyond all dharma and caste. When a sannyasin enters a Hindu temple, he is not a worshiper but one of the objects of worship. Not even the gods are sannyasins (they are householders), and so this is where in Hinduism, as in Jainism and Buddhism, it is possible for human beings to be spiritually superior to the gods. It has long been a matter of dispute in Hinduism whether one need really fulfill the requirements of the Laws of Manu (gray hair, etc.) to renounce the world. There are definitely no such requirements in Jainism or Buddhism. The Buddha left his family right after his wife had a baby, which would put him in the middle of his dharma as a householder. Jainism and Buddhism thus developed monastic institutions, but these did not really develop as such in Hinduism.

The four stages of life may, somewhat improbably, be associated with the four parts of the Vedas: the sam.hitas with the stage of the student, who is particularly obligated to learn them; the brahman.as with the stage of the householder, who is able to regulate his ritual behavior according to them; the aran.yakas with the stage of the forest dweller, who regulates his ritual behavior according to them and who begins to contemplate liberation; and finally the upanis.ads with the stage of the wandering ascetic, who is entirely concerned with meditation on the absolute, Brahman.

The twice born account for about 48% of Hindus. The rest are Shudras and Untouchables. The Shudras may represent the institutional provision that the Arya made for the people they already found in India. The Shudras thus remain once born, and traditionally are not allowed to learn Sanskrit or study the Vedas. Their dharma is to work for the twice born. But even below the Shudras are the Untouchables, who are literally "outcastes," without a varn.a, and were regarded as "untouchable" because they are ritually polluting for caste Hindus. Some Untouchable subcastes are regarded as so polluted that members are supposed to keep out of sight and do their work at night: They are called "Unseeables." In India, the term "Untouchable" is now regarded as impolite or politically incorrect (like Eta in Japan for the traditional tanners and pariahs). Gandhi's Harijans ("children of God") or Dalits ("downtrodden") are prefered, though to Americans "Untouchables" would sound more like the gangster-busting federal agent Elliot Ness from the 1920's. Why there are so many Untouchables (15%-20% or so of Hindus) is unclear, although caste Hindus can be ejected from their jatis and become outcastes and various tribal or formerly tribal people in India may never have been properly integrated into the social system. When Mahatma Gandhi's subcaste refused him permission to go to England, as noted above, he went anyway and was ejected from the caste. After he returned, his family got him back in, but while in England he was technically an outcaste. Existing tribal people, as well as Untouchables, are also called the "scheduled castes," since the British drew up a "schedule" listing the castes that they regarded as backwards, underprivileged, or oppressed.

The Untouchables, nevertheless, have their own traditional professions and their own subcastes. Those professions (unless they can be evaded in the greater social mobility of modern, urban, anonymous life) involve too much pollution to be performed by caste Hindus: (1) dealing with the bodies of dead animals (like the sacred cattle that wander Indian villages) or unclaimed dead humans, (2) tanning leather, from such dead animals, and manufacturing leather goods, and (3) cleaning up the human and animal waste for which in traditional villages there is no sewer system. Mahatma Gandhi referred to the latter euphemistically as "scavenging" but saw in it the most horrible thing imposed on the Untouchables by the caste system. His requirement on his farms in South Africa that everyone share in such tasks comes up in an early scene in the movie Gandhi. Since Gandhi equated suffering with holiness, he saw the Untouchables as hallowed by their miserable treatment and so called them "Harijans" (Hari=Vis.n.u). Later Gandhi went on fasts in the hope of improving the condition of the Untouchables, or at least to avoid their being politically classified as non-Hindus. Today the status of the Shudras, Untouchables, and other "scheduled castes," and the preferential policies that the Indian government has designed for their advancement ever since Independence, are sources of serious conflict, including murders and riots, in Indian society.
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Black
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Meme » 26th November 2012, 08:24

People of Zambia,

Learn to be coherent and focused in your discussions. The poor indian guy, wants you to dicuss developmet in Kamwala, but people are bringing long long stories of the caste system. Zambia is failling to develop due to its citizens who are lacking focus in resolviing issues. You touch here and there without resolving any of what you touched.
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Meme
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby STFU » 26th November 2012, 11:47

Hindu's believe that karma determines what type of animal they'll be reincarnated as, and get this, Cows are the top of the list. If your karma is supreme, superubber, L33TNESS, you'll be reincarnated as a cow. I guess every time I'm eating a cheeseburger I just ate a really good Hindu.
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STFU
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Brownie Zambian » 26th November 2012, 12:04

He is trying to brush everyones face with the same brush. I think what he is trying to say is that Indians are very racialists through and through. What it means here with this discussion beats me.
Anyway, this month, authorities have asked the Kuku residents to vacate the compound siting drainage blockage in Kamwala!!??
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Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Chambawamba » 26th November 2012, 18:56

I be hitting them cockroaches with a broom, killing them by the dozens. Little did I know that I'm killing my hindu brothers who were naughty in their prior lives and been reborn as cockroaches.

Next time I see a big damn roach I will tell it, look here iwe Singh, I hate to do it but I got to squish you
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Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Reason » 26th November 2012, 21:28

Does anyone know the rationale behind why the cow is held in such high regard by the Hindu? I mean apart from the obvious that these people have never tasted a goody juicy steak. And apart from the fact that most religious beliefs are based on sheer stupidity and gullibility.
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Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Aggregate » 27th November 2012, 02:39

The reverence of the cow has something to do with the stupidity of the animal so it is supposed to be incapable of doing evil because it is too stupid to devise any evil plot.

Actually I heard that one in a tavern, so I’m not sure if its fact or beer talking.
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Aggregate
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Meme » 27th November 2012, 08:54

Iye you guys you don't listen!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Talk about the Kamwala Saga-sad sad sad! Not "caste system." Too much masettings. You are like implying that the creator of this thread is going to incarnate in to a cow because of his Karma. After wards you will kill the cow and eat the juice steak. Nonsense!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Stupid Zambians.
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Meme
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Youth » 27th November 2012, 09:05

Meme
do you think a fat cow, hindu or otherwise, should be worshiped or slaughtered and eaten? Please Meme, let us not beat about the bush or plunge ourselves in mysticism or animal worship. Here is a cow. Nice and fat, just as God created it. What else is there to do than slaughter it and eat it? Can you tell me that? Meme?

Say, by the way, do you pronounce your name as meme as me (myself) and me (myself) OR me (meee cow multiplied by 2)??..
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Youth
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby ffwaka » 27th November 2012, 10:53

Chambawamba

that post or yours, now that's hilarious!
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ffwaka
 

Re: The Kamwala Saga- Sad Sad Sad!

Postby Black genious » 27th November 2012, 16:04

Peanut gallery discussion.
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Black genious
 


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